Displaying items by tag: FBI

Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer, Meng Wanzhou, raised a new argument which accused the Canadian police and border agents of colluding with the FBI.

At a court hearing in a British Columbia Supreme Court on Monday, Meng’s defense lawyer, David Martin, has argued that Canadian officials purposely delayed her arrest in December 2018 by several days in order to gather evidence for the FBI during the stopover. Adding that the “pre-planned scheme” gave authorities the opportunity to go through her personal electronic devices by pretending that it was a part of customs inspections.

Her team of lawyers have also claimed that the case the US submitted to Canada was “so replete with intentional and reckless error” that it violated her rights.

The court had previously heard that the Canada Border Service Agency had placed Meng’s devices in “signal-blocking” bags, at the request of the FBI. Also, the FBI allegedly requested the electronic serial numbers and images of her devices.

Meng, the daughter of Huawei’s Founder and CEO, Ren Zhengfei, has claimed that she is innocent. She is wanted in the US for fraud that is linked to Iran sanctions.

Her lawyer deemed the US extradition request “an extravagant extraterritorial jurisdictional reach”. Martin also pointed out a Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) memo which specifically stated that the FBI would not be present at Meng’s arrest in an effort to “avoid the perception of influence” as proof that the CSIS was “conscious of obscuring the involvement of the FBI”.

In the memo, the CSIS also warned that the arrest of the 48 year-old CFO would be a “highly political” issue, that it would “send shock waves around the world” and would definitely become “a significant bilateral issue” for Canada and China.

Zhao Lijian, the Chinese foreign ministry’s spokesperson, said that the memo showed “once again that the whole Meng Wanzhou case is a serious political incident”.

Adding that, “It speaks volumes about the US political calculations to purposefully suppress Huawei and other Chinese high-tech companies.”

"We once again urge Canada to take China's solemn position and concerns seriously, immediately release Meng and ensure her safe return to China, and not to go further down the wrong path," he said.

Published in Reports

Outgoing US President Barack Obama has called for a broad review to be conducted into the Russian hacking scandal which disrupted the US presidential election campaign last month. US Democrats believe the hacking scandal significantly benefited Donald Trump’s successful bid candidacy.

White House counterterrorism and Homeland Security adviser Lisa Monaco confirmed that President Obama has ordered intelligence officials to file a report into the hacking of Democratic officials’ e-mail accounts and Russia’s involvement in it – which has also further raised concerns over ‘foreign meddling.’

President Obama has requested the report to be submitted before he leaves office next month. However, it has not been confirmed whether or not the findings of the report will be made public. During a hostile campaign between Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump – Trump regularly referenced the e-mail hacking scandal involving Clinton, labelling her ‘crooked Hilary’ and said he believed she should be in jail.

US intelligence officials accused the Russian government of ordering the breaches as part of an effort to interfere with the presidential campaign.

In the months leading up to the election, Hillary Clinton faced intense scrutiny after it emerged she used a private server when she was Secretary of State, rather than official State Department email accounts maintained on federal servers. Those official communications included thousands of emails that would retroactively be marked classified by the state department.

The FBI initiated an investigation but recommended that no charges be filed against her. Many political analysts believe it strengthened the campaign of President elect Donald Trump. However, Trump has downplayed the possibility that Russia was involved in the hacking scandal.

Since Trump's victory, Democratic senators on the intelligence committee have been pushing Obama to declassify more information about Russia's role. Congressman Adam Schiff, the senior Democrat on the House intelligence committee, said he welcomed Obama's call for a review.

"Given President-elect Trump's disturbing refusal to listen to our intelligence community and accept that the hacking was orchestrated by the Kremlin, there is an added urgency to the need for a thorough review before President Obama leaves office next month. If the administration doesn't respond "forcefully" to such actions, "we can expect to see a lot more of this in the near future.”

The news of this investigation come hot on the heels of an announcement made by Kremlin officials last week, in which they disclosed information that Russian leader Vladimir Putin had signed a new cybersecurity doctrine in an effort to bolster Russia against cyberattacks from abroad.

Published in Government