Displaying items by tag: CEO’s

GSMA expected to discuss Huawei issue at MWC

Written on Tuesday, 05 February 2019 08:27

The governing body that represents the world’s mobile operators is expected to discuss the ongoing issue of Chinese telecommunications vendor Huawei at this month’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

The GSMA has proposed to its members that they hold a discussion regarding the possibility of a blanket ban on Huawei from the majority of developed markets within the ICT ecosystem.  A number of leading operators have expressed their disapproval at the tactics being used against Huawei, with many feeling it is a politically motivated campaign being led by the United States.

There is also a general consensus amongst ICT stakeholders and major players that any ban on Huawei will significantly impact the rollout of 5G networks. Vodafone CEO Nick Read has already publicly stated that a ban could delay the commercial deployment of 5G in Europe by up to two years.

It has been reported that the GSMA Director-General Mats Granryd has written to its members about Huawei and has said the current situation involving the Chinese vendor should be part of its agenda on its next board meeting in Barcelona later this month.

The GSMA represents mobile operators globally, and united more than 750 operators with over 350 companies as part of a broader mobile ecosystem, which includes the handset and device manufacturers, equipment providers and internet companies.

Huawei has found itself at the centre of intense scrutiny from the US in recent months, and was just like week charged with a number of indictments related to intellectual property theft and fraud. Huawei has vehemently denied any wrongdoing and has accused the US of participating in an ‘immoral political campaign’.

Diplomatic tensions between Beijing and Washington are strained and officials from both countries are set to meet again later this week to resume trade talks.

However, this isn’t the first time the US has went after a high-profile Chinese telecommunications company. Huawei’s domestic rival ZTE was pushed to the brink of bankruptcy after draconian measures were imposed against them by the US Department of Commerce.

Huawei has been banned from any role in the rollout of 5G networks in Australia and New Zealand. The European Union has said it will look at the issues that have been alleged by the US.

Published in Telecom Vendors

Some of the most prominent figures in the US technology sector have publicly expressed their dismay and anger following the racially charged violence in Charlottesville, Virginia last week. Microsoft, Apple and Facebook have all announced they will implement measures in a bid to fightback against the rise of white supremacists in the US.

Apple CEO, Tim Cook criticized President Trump’s response to the events last week - and in a letter to his employees said counter-protesters were standing up for human rights. Cook said, “I disagree with the president and others who believe that there is a moral equivalence between white supremacists and Nazis, and those who oppose them by standing up for human rights. Equating the two runs counter to our ideals as Americans.”

Cook revealed that Apple would contribute $1 million each to the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League, who are both human right groups. In addition to this, he said it was suspending its Apple Pay support on websites that sell white supremacy clothing and accessories. E-commerce platform PayPal has also implemented similar measures.

Microsoft CEO, Satya Nadella also voiced her concern at the violence in Virginia, and said there was absolutely unequivocally no place for such racist rhetoric in the US. In a letter to employees, Nadella said, “There is no place in our society for the bias, bigotry and senseless violence we witnessed this weekend in Virginia provoked by white nationalists.”

Cloud security and performance firm Cloud-flare also publicly announced that it has now terminated its account with neo-Nazi outlet ‘The Daily Stormer. The publication drew widespread criticism following the publication of a hate-filled feature on the victims of the Charlottesville violence.

Social media colossus Facebook has also moved swiftly to take action and suspended the account of infamous white supremacist Christopher Cantwell’s accounts on both Facebook and Instagram. Twitter has also removed the online account of The Daily Stormer from its platform.

President Trump drew criticism from technology leaders following his appointment to The White House in November. His controversial policies on immigration were widely condemned in Silicon Valley, and while President Trump has taken steps to build relationships with technology firms in Silicon Valley since taking office – there scathing criticism of his response to Charlottesville will not be well received by either Trump or his republican administration in Washington DC.

Published in Government

US president elect holds talks with Silicon Valley tech leaders

Written on Thursday, 15 December 2016 13:01

US president elect Donald Trump has met with a number of the world’s leading technology figures ahead of his inauguration ceremony next month. During a toxic battle for The White House, which has divided a nation, tech leaders in Silicon Valley were extremely critical of Trump – and said if he were to be elected, it would be a disaster for innovation and the technology industry.

However, the 70-year-old billionaire has attempted to alleviate fears in the tech sector by organising a meeting with industry leaders in the US. Many of those that attended the meeting were pro-Hilary Clinton during the campaign, with many being vocal in their support for the Democratic nominee. The one exception was PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel, and it was conveyed that he was the central figure in organizing the meeting.

Trump headed into hostile territory knowing how he was perceived by some of America’s most powerful tech executives, but he was undeterred as he attempted to form new relationships in an effort to promote job creation and facilitate trade.

Some high-profile senators have expressed concern over Trump’s decision to make ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson his Secretary of State, with the oil tycoon having close ties to Moscow. Relations with Russia are at their worst in years – following the CIA’s assessment that Russia where in fact involved in the hacking scandal that disrupted the presidential election campaign. Some tech leaders have also expressed concern at Trump’s response to the CIA’s report. He rubbished Russia’s involvement and slammed the report labelling the claims as ‘ridiculous’.

However, Trump reassured tech leaders of his commitment to the sector, and promised to help them continue their incredible innovation plans, adding that he was here to help.

Trump said: “I'm here to help you folks do well," Trump told the industry leaders in opening remarks that reporters were briefly allowed to observe after the tech titans went around the table introducing themselves. We want you to keep going with the incredible innovation. “There's nobody like you in the world," he said.

Trump was joined at the meeting by Vice President elect Mike Pence and a number of high-profile CEOs that included Tim Cook (Apple), Satya Nadella (Microsoft) and Larry Page of Alphabet (Google). Also in attendance were Facebook’s chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg and Oracle chief executive, Safra Catz, although it was noted that Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey was not present. Reports suggested Twitter were excluded from the meeting due to their refusal to allow an emoji version of the hashtag which read ‘crooked Hilary’.

Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence sat in the middle of the table with CEOs that included Tim Cook of Apple, Satya Nadella of Microsoft and Larry Page of Alphabet (Google). What effects a Trump presidency will have on the tech sector is hard to predict.

While the tech industry is likely to oppose any trade barriers or efforts to limit immigration, many companies are expected to welcome a lowering of corporate tax rates promised by Trump, especially on profits repatriated from overseas. "We're going to make fair trade deals. We're going to make it a lot easier for you to trade across borders. There have been a lot of restrictions, a lot of problems that I think you see. And if you have any ideas on that issue then that would be great.”

Tech firms led by Apple are responsible for the lion's share of an estimated $2.5 trillion being held overseas by US companies, and are reluctant to bring those funds back and face a hefty tax bill. A potential clash between Trump and the sector is possible over encryption, and the ability of enforcement and intelligence services to decrypt devices for national security investigations.

None of the industry leaders stopped to talk to reporters on their way out of the building at the end, except Catz who gave a little wave. Trump said he would add Musk and Uber CEO Travis Kalanick to his advisory council of business leaders tasked with helping to create new jobs "across the United States from Silicon Valley to the heartland."

Trump is putting the finishing touches to his cabinet, nominating former Texas governor Rick Perry as energy secretary and reportedly choosing Montana Representative Ryan Zinke as interior secretary. Perry, who participated in the Republican primary but was crushed by Trump early on, once assailed him as a "cancer on conservatism." On Wednesday, Forbes magazine ranked Trump as the second most powerful person of the year -- right behind Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Published in Government