Displaying items by tag: Testing

South Korean multinational conglomerate Samsung has been given the green light to begin testing its self-driving technology on public roads in the country. The South Korean government gave the smartphone colossus permission to test out the new self-driving technologies it has developed. Samsung is the latest amongst a number of other companies that were granted approval to begin testing self-driving tech on the country’s road.

Samsung have long expressed its desire to develop cutting edge self-driving technology, and has previously disclosed that it was developing the tech – which is set to completely revolutionize the car industry. South Korea’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport formally announced that it approved Samsung’s request. It has now paved the way for Samsung to begin testing its modified test car, which is equipped with sensors and cameras which is used to run Samsung’s software for autonomous driving.

Hyundai was actually the first to gain approval to test autonomous tech on South Korean roads, having cleared the hurdle more than a year ago in February, 2016. Regulations have also eased in that time: Companies can now test vehicles with just one human driver, where the rule when first implemented required at least two people on board during testing.

California is also looking to ease its requirements. South Korea’s recent rule changes also include laying the groundwork for allowing vehicles without any steering wheels or pedals, which is part of the proposed amendments to California regulations; Michigan recently passed a law that allows for the same.

Published in Internet of Things

One of Australia’s leading telecommunication companies has announced that it will launch a new IoT lab which has been described as a ‘game changer’ for the country’s IoT ecosystem. Telstra Corporation Limited - is one of Australia’s largest and most successful telecommunications and media organizations.

It formally disclosed details regarding the launch of its IoT lab in Melbourne, after months of speculation surrounding the project. Telstra CTO, Hakan Eriksson outlined his vision for the project, and said that he hopes university students, start-ups and multinational companies can work with some of the best equipment and minds in this industry in order to bring their IoT solution to life.

According to Eriksson the IoT lab in Melbourne will be a public space which will allow anyone with the opportunity to create, test and prototype IoT solutions which shared the goal to improve the overall IoT ecosystem in Australia.

The lab seeks to enable those in the IoT sector to assess how their IoT applications and services will work on Telstra’s network through stringent testing in a controlled environment. In addition to this, the Australian telecommunications company stressed that the new facility was the latest phase in its overall ‘Innovation Lab initiative’ which included both software and hardware for testing.

Telstra’s CTO conceded that from their standpoint, they’re experts from a network perspective, but not in relation to applications in areas such as agriculture, power distribution and logistics. He told The Financial Review, “We’re experts in the network part of it, but not in all the applications that run on top such as agricultural applications, power distribution applications or logistics applications… and they are not experts in networks, so we needed a meeting place.”

Eriksson suggested that innovators will also want to gain access to the lab in order to utilize Telstra’s infrastructure, experts, community engagement, facilitators, and extensive 4G network. He also disclosed that Telstra plan to bring in a 5G test network in 2018, as the organization ramps up its effort to implement the revolutionary technology by 2020. He said: "We will start doing trials in 2018 with 5G, so it will be very natural to bring some of that into the lab.”

Published in Telecom Operators