Displaying items by tag: Huawei

China defends Huawei over latest espionage accusations

Written on Wednesday, 16 January 2019 07:09

China has called upon other countries to cease the “groundless fabrications and unreasonable restrictions” against technology giant Huawei, after a Polish official said his country could limit the use of the company’s products by public entities following the arrest of Huawei employee Wang Weijing.

Poland is the latest country to express concerns over Huawei devices amidst security fears. Joachim Brudzinski, Poland’s internal affairs minister, has called for the European Union and NATO to work on a joint position over whether to exclude Huawei from their markets.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said the accusatory security threats “suppress and restrict Chinese technology companies’ development abroad”, and China hoped the Polish side would work to create mutual trust and maintain relations.

“We urge relevant parties to cease the groundless fabrications and unreasonable restrictions toward Huawei and other Chinese companies, and create a fair, good and just environment for mutual investment and normal cooperation by both sides’ companies,” Hua Chunying said.

“Using security reasons to hype, obstruct or restrict normal cooperation between companies in the end will only hurt one’s own interests.”

The Shenzhen-based equipment company has seen their equipment banned from Australia, New Zealand and Japan, and stripped from core telecom systems in the United Kingdom. Governments around the world have grown increasingly wary of Huawei’s presence in critical national telecoms infrastructure, amid cybersecurity fears and potential links to Beijing.

Pressure from the United States secret service to boycott Huawei equipment has led to a number of countries to exclude the phone giant in their rollout of 5G networks. In August, The Trump administration signed a bill that barred the U.S. government from using Huawei equipment and is reportedly considering an executive order that would also ban U.S. companies from using the Chinese products.

An executive for Huawei Meng Wanzhou was also arrested in December in Canada at the request of U.S authorities and awaits possible extradition to the U.S.  Huawei has always strenuously denied all accusations of espionage, and Hua Chunying maintained Wang Weijing’s alleged actions had “no relation to the company.”

Huawei has since sacked Wang after he was arrested along with a Polish security official on charges of spying for the Chinese government. In a statement, the company said the former employee had brought “disrepute” to the company.

Karol Okonski, a Polish government official responsible for cyber security said that “abrupt” policy changes toward Huawei were not warranted after the arrests, but that the use of the company’s products by state entities could be reviewed.

Published in Telecom Vendors

A state-run Chinese tabloid newspaper has written a strongly-worded editorial in which it has condemned the actions of Poland in the arrest of Huawei executive Wang Weijing in Warsaw.

Polish special agents arrested the executive for the Chinese telecommunications giant for alleged espionage after a lengthy investigation. Authorities claim that they believe he was spying for China.

Huawei moved swiftly in terms of responding to the latest controversy involving one of its employees by terminating the contract of Wang Weijing with immediate effect. However, the nationalist tabloid Global Times has been critical of the way Poland has handled the situation and has accused them of being an accomplice of the United States.

The newspaper wrote, “Beijing should resolutely negotiate with Warsaw and conduct relative counter-measures, helping the world understand that Poland is an accomplice of the US.”

The editorial added that if Huawei suffers further setbacks as a result of this arrest, which it more than likely will, then it will affect the confidence of Chinese society - and would represent an example to the rest of the world that it can bully Chinese enterprises. The paper has pleaded for China to remain strong and has called for Poland to suffer as a consequence of its actions.

The editorial said, “China must not be soft at this point. Beijing will not bully Warsaw -- and it is unworthy to do so -- but the latter must pay for the offense.”

The newspaper did not clarify as to what kind of measures China should take. China’s Foreign Ministry voiced its concerns about Wang's arrest in Poland, whilst as aforementioned above Huawei has sought to distance itself from the case as it fired the employee, saying his alleged actions have no relation to the company.

 A Polish man was also arrested for alleged espionage along with Wang on Tuesday.  Both men are suspected of having worked for Chinese services and to the detriment of Poland," according to Polish special services spokesman Stanislaw Zaryn.

Published in Telecom Vendors

Chinese telecommunications behemoth Huawei has moved swiftly to terminate the contract of an employee who has been arrested in Poland amidst claims he was spying for China.

Huawei executive Wang Weijing was detained by Polish authorities on Friday, following a lengthy investigation that was conducted by Poland’s special services. It is believed that Weijing is a director for the Polish branch of Huawei.

It’s the latest setback for Huawei’s brand globally following the high-profile arrest of the vendors’ CTO, Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver in December. She is fighting extradition to the US, where she stands accused of fraud relating to business activity in Iran.

The Chinese vendor robustly defended its CTO following her arrest and demanded her immediate release from jail. However, Huawei has wasted no timing in trying to distance itself from this latest scandal in Poland by announcing it has fired the employee in question for harming the company’s global reputation.

In a statement given to the Global Times, Huawei said that Wang Weijing was arrested for ‘personal reasons’ and said the incident caused significant damage to the company at a time when it’s under intense scrutiny regarding security.

Huawei cited management rules in company contracts and said it was left with no decision but to terminate its employer relationship with Wang Weijing immediately.  Poland has claimed that they firmly believe the Huawei executive was spying for China.

China’s Foreign Ministry responded quickly to the claims made by Polish authorities and expressed that it was ‘highly concerned’ by the arrest. The latest controversy is something Huawei really could’ve done without.

US President Donald Trump is expected to issue an executive order which would ban US companies from working with Chinese vendors ZTE and Huawei over the alleged risk both pose to national security.

In addition to this, Australia and Japan have blocked Huawei from participating in the construction of their super-fast 5G networks, whilst the UK and New Zealand are also considering banning the vendor from the rollout of its 5G networks.

EU spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic refused to "speculate" when asked Friday if there were any concerns about Chinese retaliation.

"We are aware of the reports and we will be indeed in touch with the Polish authorities for further information," she told reporters. 

Published in Telecom Vendors

Embattled Chinese telecommunication vendors Huawei and ZTE have received a welcome reprieve following the news that two Spanish operators are planning on using them for forthcoming 5G pilots.

Published in Telecom Vendors

Chinese telecommunication vendors ZTE and Huawei have both endured a difficult number of years in the US marketplace – and their issues have multiplied during the Trump administration.

ZTE were momentarily crippled and almost went out of business following a decision by the US Department of Commerce to ban US companies from using their equipment and products for 7 years. However, following an intervention from US President Donald Trump, the ban was overturned and the vendor was instead hit with a $1bn fine and has to adhere to a number of strict rules and regulations.

Huawei have also been subjected to sharp criticism and have been deemed by US intelligence as a serious threat to national security due to their close ties to the Chinese government. Observers believe that the aggression from the US towards the Chinese telecommunication vendors is part of Trump’s plan to use them as pawns in his trade war with China.

Tensions between Washington and Beijing escalated when ZTE were initially banned, and it sparked an angry backlash from China. The rest of the world looked on anxiously as the two economic superpowers clashed head-on, it has since deescalated, but the high-profile arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver has once again put diplomatic relations between the two countries under the microscope.

However, the situation in the US for both ZTE and Huawei is set to worsen following reports that US President Donald Trump is set to issue an executive order that would effectively ban operators in the country from using the Chinese manufacturer’s equipment and products.

Reuters has reported that the Trump administration has been mulling over the order for eight months, but it expected to formally enact it later this month.  It is said the order would not name Huawei or its compatriot ZTE by name but would give the US Department of Commerce scope to ban any supplier it suspects of being a threat to national security.

Published in Telecom Vendors

There is always good in people!

Written on Wednesday, 26 December 2018 09:07

By Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer, Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver on December 19, 2018

Meng Wanzhou has kept a diary for years. Below is what she wrote on December 19, 2018:



Last night, a letter from a Japanese citizen went viral on my WeChat Moments, and this letter has really warmed my heart. As the old saying goes, there is always good in people! Before I ran into difficulties, I hadn't known that so many people I don't know personally cared about me.

On the day of my bail, I waited in the court to go through the formalities. My lawyer told me that many strangers had called his law firm and offered to put up their properties as a guarantee against my bail. Even though they had never heard of me, they knew Huawei and they trusted Huawei, and were therefore willing to believe in me. My lawyer said that he had been practicing law for over 40 years and had never seen anything like this, with so many strangers willing to issue guarantees for a person that they don't know personally. Listening to the lawyer's words, I couldn't help but burst into tears. I wasn't crying for myself; instead I was moved by the thought that so many people had trust in me.

When the earthquake struck Fukushima eight years ago, I was at the IBM HQ in the US for a week-long workshop. We were holding a final round of discussions with IBM's senior financial experts on whether to launch the Integrated Financial Services (IFS) program, and the scope of this program.

At that time, the company had just decided that the finance team should be responsible for all emergency plans, including those for conflicts, plagues, unrest, and earthquakes. The finance team and the business team were required to develop emergency plans for various scenarios and organize drills. This would ensure that all departments could mobilize resources and respond quickly to any disasters, as planned. As I was attending the workshop in the US, Madam Sun went to Japan alone.

After returning from the US, I shared my takeaways from the workshop in the US with our colleagues in the finance department. Following discussions, we reached a consensus and determined our approach for the upcoming financial transformation that was to be presented to the IBM consultants. Immediately, after this was completed, I booked a plane ticket and flew to Tokyo. I met with our colleagues in the Japan Office, and discussed post-disaster work arrangements, including our plans to repair customer networks and ensure normal operations continued in the office.

Before I went to Japan, the company had already set up an emergency response team to deal with the disaster, and Madam Sun had just returned from the country. There was not actually much work for me to do after I arrived. Instead, I, along with my colleagues in the Japan Office, simply went through the work that needed to be done during the two weeks after the devastating earthquake. We also ensured we prioritized the tasks that should be done, and I made lots of notes.

This earthquake was actually the first case of the finance department being involved in the design and implementation of a crisis contingency plan. There were some flaws with collaboration during the post-disaster restoration work. Despite this, we gained precious experience. When a devastating earthquake struck Nepal several years later, we already had a solid crisis contingency plan, which helped us to promptly and fully support post-disaster restoration work. This won high acclaim from our Nepalese customers.

I barely talked to other people about what I did after the Japanese earthquake, because it wasn't something I felt I should brag about. It's just my job. As they say, “Good people will be rewarded for what they do.” It didn't occur to me that this reward would come in the form of a letter from an ordinary Japanese citizen eight years later. This letter filled me with tremendous pride and joy. I was so proud of myself for mustering the courage to board that plane to Japan in spite of the risks. I was brave not because I was not scared, but because I had faith. I have also been filled with joy because this proves that hard work always pays off.

Background:

A letter to Meng Wanzhou, and all Huawei employees, from an ordinary citizen in Tokyo

On December 17, 2018, Huawei's Japanese Representative Office in Otemachi, Tokyo, received a letter from an ordinary citizen in Tokyo. The letter also included the citizen's real name. To protect this individual's privacy, the name was removed when the letter was shared on Huawei's Xinsheng Community. The letter was written with plain words, but inspired everyone who read it.

Huawei stays with customers after the Fukushima earthquake



During a speech at Tsinghua University in September 2016, Meng Wanzhou shared the story of the Fukushima earthquake in public for the first time. She picked out the two factors that were most important to Huawei's success: creating value for customers and dedication. As she recounted the story, she explained, “In 2011, Japan experienced a magnitude-9.0 earthquake, resulting in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. While other telecom equipment suppliers were scrambling to evacuate the region, Huawei chose to stay. After the earthquake, I flew from Hong Kong to Japan, on a flight where I was one of the only two passengers. During meetings at the Japan Office, aftershocks drained the blood from our employees' faces. However, we gradually got used to them. As all of this was happening, our engineers were heading for Fukushima in protective outfits to repair the communications equipment and restore communications for our customers. We were bold not because we had no fear, but because we had faith.”

As many flights were getting out of Japan, Meng Wanzhou chose to go in the opposite direction. The other passenger on her flight, a Japanese, even asked whether Meng had taken the wrong flight. The crew had also double checked this with Meng.

After the earthquake, Sun Yafang, Huawei chairwoman at the time, immediately led a team to Japan. Employees at the Japan Office remained at their post, repairing the communications equipment and restoring communications for customers.

On April 3, 2011, Huawei's internal publication, Huawei People, published an article about an employee, Zhang Liang, recalling the moment:

“Everybody was devoted to their work as usual, and reassured their families that they were safe. One of our colleagues was moved to a room in Tokyo, to video call his aged mother, 'Mom, I have already been evacuated to Osaka. Look, this is my new dorm.'

A newly-wed told his wife during a video call: 'Don't worry, honey. I'm fine. The news in China has been exaggerating the situation. Our executives have come to visit; we will have supper together.'

During the dinner, Madam Sun looked around at all the staff that had stayed and said encouragingly, 'Tokyo is currently like sitting at the eye of a hurricane. The surrounding areas are in chaos, but we have managed to stay calm as usual in the center.'”

Managers' leading by example has become an integral part of Huawei's culture

At a meeting with employees of Huawei's Office in Nepal on February 15, 2017, Ren Zhengfei said, “You have my commitment: As long as I am able to take flights, I will come to visit you in hardship regions, and even regions struck by conflicts or epidemics. If I were afraid of death, how could I ask you to remain dedicated? When I ask you to be dedicated, I myself will be dedicated, too.”

During his presentation at a recruitment meeting in Wuhan University, Yi Xiang, President of Huawei's Middle East & Africa Region, shared the following story.

“On the night of September 20, 2008, a blast erupted in Islamabad, the capital of Pakistan, and caused more than 300 casualties. Our CEO Mr. Ren wanted to visit us onsite in Pakistan and Afghanistan. I was the General Manager of the Pakistan Office at that time. Considering Ren's safety, I repeatedly advised him not to come. He sent me a reply, which I will never forget during the rest of my life. 'Why can't I go to places where our pals go? The next person who tries to stop me will be dismissed!' After reading this email, all the staff in our office were moved to tears.”

“After Mr. Ren arrived at Islamabad, he took a flight to Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan, to visit Huawei employees there. In fact, Mr. Ren also visited the employees of Huawei's competitors, and asked Huawei's rescue team to offer them assistance.”

Human kindness has no boundaries. There is always good in people!

Published in Featured

Huawei executive granted bail

Written on Wednesday, 12 December 2018 10:52

Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Huawei, has been released on Can$10 million bail by a Canadian court. The Chinese telecom executive faces a US extradition bid on charges related to alleged violations of Iran sanctions.

She was ordered to surrender her passport and will be subjected to electronic monitoring whilst she stays in Vancouver. Her lawyer said she was not deemed a flight risk, as she did not want to ‘embarrass China.’

The daughter of Huawei’s founder, Meng is accused of lying to bankers about the use of a covert subsidiary to sell to Iran in breach of sanctions. She faces more than 30 years in prison if she is convicted.

The extradition process, scheduled to start on February 6, could take months or even years.

Her arrest has shaken China's relations with Canada and the United States, with concerns that it could derail a US-China trade war truce. President Donald Trump has said he "would certainly intervene" in the case if it can help strike a deal with China.

Meanwhile, the US State Department called on China to "end all forms of arbitrary detentions" after Michael Kovrig - a North East Asia senior adviser, and former Canadian diplomat - was detained in Beijing. The international crisis group (ICG) said in a statement that it has received no information about Kovrig since his detention and is concerned about his health and safety.

Former Canadian ambassador to Beijing, Guy Saint-Jacques, said Kovrig's detention was likely linked to Meng's case.

"There is no coincidence in China," Saint-Jacques told AFP. "In this case it is clear the Chinese government wants to put maximum pressure on the Canadian government."

Published in Telecom Vendors

Huawei’s rotating chairman Ken Hu has pleaded with the governments of countries who have banned the Chinese telecommunications behemoth from becoming involved in the rollout of 5G networks, to produce evidence that implicates Huawei as a serious security threat.

Huawei’s CEO robustly defended its security record and expressed his disappointment that countries banned the Chinese vendor before affording them the opportunity to engage in dialogue which would’ve allowed them to take action, or respond to the allegations that it was a threat to domestic security.

In a press conference held at its HQ in Shenzhen, Hu said, “When it comes to security, we need to let the facts speak for themselves. Huawei’s record on security is clean. In over 30 years, the company has never had a serious cyber security issue or seen any evidence showing its equipment is a security threat. We have a solid track record.”

New Zealand and Australia have banned Huawei from their 5G projects, whilst it is also believed that the UK, Germany, Japan and South Korea are also considering the possibility of preventing Huawei from becoming involved in their 5G rollout plans.

However, Hu acknowledged that the vendor needed to be proactive with governments and customers, but stressed that they had already been doing this, and were willing to take additional steps in an effort to not be locked out of 5G programs in the west.

Hu added, “We will not relax. As technology becomes more complex and networks become more open, we will continue to increase our investment in security related efforts.”

For example, Huawei plans to launch a security centre in Brussels in Q1 2019 as part of a longer-term plan to expand cooperation with other governments around the world, such as Canada and the UK. In addition to this, it will invest $2 billion over the next five years to improve its software engineering processes to be better prepared for the future.

The recent high-profile arrest of the company’s CFO in Canada has reignited trade tensions and diplomatic relations between the US and China. However, despite the controversies and turmoil, Huawei is targeting a record of $100bn in total revenue for the year, and has secured more than 25 commercial 5G contracts and shipped more than 10,000 5G base stations.

Hu declined to comment on the ongoing situation with Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou because it was an ongoing case, but he did reiterate that the company is confident in its trade compliance measures along with the judicial systems in Canada and the US.

Published in Telecom Vendors

Huawei and Honor to release two new smartphones

Written on Thursday, 20 December 2018 08:40

Huawei has unveiled the eagerly anticipated Nova 4 smartphone.

The model features an innovative circular “hole-punch” cut-out for the 25-megapixel selfie camera, and a 48-megapixel primary camera on the rear.

It also boasts an impressive 6.40-inch touch-screen display with a resolution of 1080 pixels by 2310 pixels at a PPI of 398 pixels per inch. Features include face unlock technology, finger print and proximity sensors and will be available in the colours black, white, blue and red.  

The Chinese phone manufacturer released a series of teaser posters in the build-up to its launch, which will take place at the Hunan International Convention and Exhibition Center in the city of Changsha, China on December 17th.

Huawei’s sub-brand Honor also unveiled their View 20 which features a similar hole-punch design and rear 48-megapixel camera. It will feature a Kirin 980 processor, whereas the Nova 4 will feature the older Kirin 970, found in the View 10 and the Huawei P20 Pro.
The Nova 4 will be released in China first before its launch in India and Europe, whist Honor’s View 20 has yet to announce its launch date.

Published in Devices

Experts claim Huawei suspicions are unfounded

Written on Thursday, 20 December 2018 08:27

A top German IT watchdog has refuted claims that Huawei could be using their equipment to spy for Beijing.

Head of Germany's Federal Office for Information Security (BSI), Arne Schoenbohm has spoken skeptically of the boycott, after the agency examined Huawei equipment and was unable to uncover any ‘reliable findings’ to support espionage claims.

BSI experts - who oversee computer and communications security for Germany -believe the lack of evidence is not enough to warrant a global ban.

"For such serious decisions like a ban, you need proof," Schoenbohm pointed out.

 Chinese phone giant Huawei has faced international scrutiny over the past year, with Western countries growing increasingly wary of the Chinese phone maker’s involvement in telecommunication infrastructure. Pressure from the United States secret service to boycott Huawei equipment has led to a number of countries, including Japan and Australia, to exclude the phone giant in their rollout of 5G networks.

New Zealand’s largest carrier Spark had had plans to use the Huawei’s 5G equipment for their launch in July 2020, but was denied by the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB). 
His comments follow the announcement that rival Chinese phone maker ZTE will cease to maintain mobile operator O2’s network in Germany – a subsidiary of Spain’s Telefonica – as of next year, amidst security fears.

BSI experts insist Huawei has nothing to hide, after the agency visited Huawei labs in Bonn, set up so customers can inspect products, including the source code of software.

Huawei models remain the most popular in Germany, with three of their main networks using the Chinese equipment.

Published in Telecom Vendors
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