Displaying items by tag: mmWave

Telcos team up on first 5G NR video call in Europe

Written on Thursday, 03 January 2019 11:25

Telecom Italia (TIM), Qualcomm Technologies and Ericsson have successfully completed the first, live video call in Europe using 5G millimeter wave (mmWave) spectrum.

The partners used a smartphone equipped with the Qualcomm Snapdragon X50 5G chipset on Ericsson equipment to make the call during the inauguration of the TIM’s new 5G Innovation Hub in Rome.

The new TIM 5G Innovation Hub aims to attract and support an ecosystem of startups, research centers and other stakeholders interested in the digital transformation. In addition to the 5G video call, TIM also showcased a series of new services including a remote-driven car; a virtual museum tour, remote controlled industrial robots; and multiplayer interactive video gaming using augmented reality.

Mario Di Mauro, Chief Strategy, Innovation and Customer Experience Officer at TIM, said: “When we started to define the strategy and the development plans for 5G, we immediately realized that such a massive challenge could not be faced without the support of a wide range of partners committed to the same goal. We therefore proposed Qualcomm Technologies set up a place where work on the new 5G services and every business idea could find a quick realization thanks to the support of leading international technology players, innovative partners and start-ups from the local and national ecosystem.”

Published in Infrastructure

During Qualcomm’s 4G/5G Summit in Hong Kong, the company announced a collaboration with US telecom company Verizon, and Novatel Wireless, an Inseego company, to help move the mobile ecosystem towards faster validation and commercialization of 5G NR mmWave technologies, supporting a full-scale commercial network deployment before the end of the decade.

The companies announced plans to collaborate on 5G New Radio (NR) millimeter wave (mmWave) technology development and over-the air field trials based on the 5G NR Release-15 specifications being developed by 3GPP – the global 5G standard. They plan to focus on 5G NR operation in 28 GHz and 39 GHz mmWave spectrum bands, showcasing advanced 5G NR technologies to efficiently achieve robust multi-gigabit per second data rates with mobility at significantly lower latencies than today’s networks.

“We have tremendous excitement around 5G and today we made a great announcement – a commitment to driving the 5G ecosystem,” said Atish Gude, SVP Corporate Strategy, Verizon, speaking at the summit. “We have a great history of partnership [with Qualcomm]. We have a drive with Qualcomm to accelerate field trials, accelerate 5G’s commercial launch, and this just shows our commitment to 5G and millimeter wave. We’ve very excited about this development.”

The technologies are expected to be critical to meeting the increasing connectivity requirements for emerging consumer mobile and fixed wireless broadband experiences such as streaming high-definition video, immersive virtual/augmented reality, and connected cloud computing. “We think all of these will drive not only new revenue for us in the industry in fixed but also in mobile services, and we’re very excited about that,” said Mr. Gude.

The three companies plan on delivering a common 5G NR mmWave technology platform for mobile and home broadband wireless access, supporting a 5G NR migration path for Verizon’s early 5G fixed wireless access deployments and trials based on the 5G-Technology Forum specifications.

“Verizon’s investment in mmWave spectrum has given us the flexibility to pursue a first-of its kind fixed wireless broadband customer trial, which has been invaluable in advancing our expertise in the deployment of mmWave technology,” said Ed Chan, SVP, Verizon Technology Strategy & Planning. “With the collaboration we’re announcing today, we are taking the next logical step towards extending our leadership position in the advancement of 5G, part of the Verizon Intelligent Edge Network.”

One of the fundamental advantages of New Radio 5G technology is that you get very low latency, said Christiano Amon, EVP, Qualcomm Technologies. This concept of being “cloud connected” having all your data in the cloud takes things to “a whole new level” he said. Having 1 millisecond speeds removes all boundaries.

“Qualcomm Technologies is committed to delivering 5G NR mmWave technologies to meet the ever-increasing connectivity requirements for enhanced mobile broadband experiences,” said Joe Glynn, vice president, business development, Qualcomm Technologies. “We are excited to collaborate with Verizon in making 5G NR mmWave a commercial reality for mobile devices, including fixed wireless home routers, mobile hotspots, tablets and smartphones.”

Published in Telecom Operators

Apple granted mmWave license by FCC to test 5G

Written on Thursday, 25 May 2017 09:54

Apple has been granted an experimental millimeter wave (mmWave) license it requested from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States. The technology is part of Apple’s mandate for future deployments of 5G networks. The FCC cleared Apple for future testing of the technology.

The purpose of mmWave technology is to enable quicker data speeds on mobile networks, and improve cellular performance on mobile phones. According to Business Insider, Apple plans to use the license issued by the FCC to ensure compatibility of its iPhone devices with future 5G mobile networks.

Apple, according to its application to the FCC, said it plans to “assess cellular link performance in direct path and multipath environments between base station transmitters and receivers using this spectrum. These assessments will provide engineering data relevant to the operation of device on wireless carriers’ future 5G networks.”

Apple says the testing process, which will take place in two locations in California, will take longer than one year. Telecom operators in the US and around the world are already planning their paths towards launching 5G and have begun conducting trials, despite the fact that 5G standards are yet to be confirmed. Given Apple products’ heavy reliance on mobile networks to function, the company’s move is no surprise.

Published in Telecom Vendors

Nokia and AT&T are collaborating to further advance 5G technology in the 39 GHz band by recently completing fixed wireless 5G tests with AT&T's Internet TV streaming service, DIRECTV NOW. Nokia achieved this world's first by delivering a 39 GHz system based on its commercially available AirScale radio access platform. The test demonstrates how new services can be successfully delivered with new technologies operating at high frequencies.

"With this trial, we're doing something that no other operator has done - regionally or globally,” said Tom Keathley, senior vice president, Wireless Network Architecture and Design, AT&T. “We expect 39 GHz to be an important 5G band in the United States, and we look forward to continuing our collaboration with Nokia to further advance 5G technology in this  band. The work coming out of AT&T Labs will provide valuable contributions to future 5G standards, and allow us to pave the way for delivering significantly faster speeds and a better overall network experience for our customers across the U.S."

Both the 39 GHz band and the 28 GHz band are particularly attractive due to the large bandwidth available; however, there is significantly more bandwidth available in the 39 GHz, which makes it a strong candidate to support 5G deployments. Nokia began testing mmWave technology with AT&T in 2016. For its recent tests of DIRECTV NOW over 39 GHz, Nokia delivered a 5G radio access system, conducting the trial at the AT&T Labs facility in Middletown, New Jersey.

The results from this world's first such trial will help advance the viability of 39 GHz, which AT&T expects to play a key role in 5G development and deployment. The testing of DIRECTV NOW also demonstrates 5G's promise of providing new experiences to end users with its ultra-low network latency and higher throughput - all important requirements for both media services and the industrial Internet.

"AT&T has laid out its path to 5G, and we're excited to help them execute on it,” said Ricky Corker, head of North America, Nokia. “We continue leveraging our innovations to make 5G a commercial reality. And, delivering a 39 GHz system for AT&T is a great example of our commitment to provide the most relevant services and solutions, and the best collaborative experience to our customers."

Published in Telecom Operators

The use of mobile data has skyrocketed over the past five years. Research suggests that data usage in 2015 increased 74 percent, putting the overall figure at around 3.7 exabytes per month. Behind this growth is the explosion of streaming services, including audio and video, as well as the growing use of apps - all served by the expectation of having high-speed data at all times . 4G is the current global standard in developed markets for mobile broadband, but 5G, which will provide faster speeds and more capacity, is just around the corner, according to analysts.

A study led by chipset giant Qualcomm claims that by 2035, 5G's "full economic benefit should be realized across the globe," and could produce up to $13.3 trillion worth of goods and services. Overall, 5th Generation (5G) mobile networks are expected to handle much more data volume, connect many more devices, and significantly reduce latency, which will eventually bring new levels of reliability to users.

Qualcomm's study indicates that the 5G value chain itself is seen as generating up to $3.5 trillion in revenue in 2035 and could support 22 million jobs. The study further claims that, over time, 5G will boost real global GDP growth by $3 trillion dollars cumulatively from 2020 to 2035, roughly the equivalent of adding an economy the size of India. Tell this to the next person who asks you why 5G is such a big deal…

A report by the National Infrastructure Commission defines 5G as "seamless connectivity". 5G will be, "Ultra-fast, ultra-reliable," and have "ultra-high capacity transmitting at super low latency," says the report. "It will support the ever larger data requirements of the existing network and new applications from augmented reality to connected vehicles and the Internet of Things, and many more, as unknowable today as the 4G services we take for granted would have been a decade ago."

There are plenty of reasons to look forward to 5G deployment, but the question is: when can we expect to use it? In a 2016 post by analyst Mike Roberts, Practice Leader covering carrier strategy and technology at global technology research and advisory firm Ovum, he says it's likely that 5G commercial services will launch in 2020 and says there will be 24 million 5G subscriptions worldwide at the end of 2021 for fixed mobile and fixed broadband services.

Roberts says North America and Asia will each account for more than 40% of global 5G subscriptions at the end of 2021, which will be followed by Europe with more than 10 percent of subscriptions, and then the Middle East and Africa accounting for the rest.

Ovum estimates that 5G services will be available in over 20 markets worldwide by the end of 2021, with services in all four major world regions. However, the report indicates that the vast majority of 5G subscriptions will be concentrated in the US, Japan, China, and South Korea, where major operators have revealed aggressive timelines for launching 5G services.

Commercial 5G: A global race
US telecoms giant AT&T recently announced the cities where it will initiate its first 5G rollout campaigns. It will launch 5G in the US cities of Austin, Texas and Indianapolis, Indiana. The company has dubbed the high-speed network plans the ‘5G Evolution' and has indicated that it will we be able to provide staggering top speeds of up to 400Mbps - which, to put that into context, is around forty times faster than a standard cellular data connection.

Network upgrades could enable peak speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second in some areas this year, according to AT&T. The initial rollout is part of a much larger project initiative by the US's second-largest wireless carrier. Network 3.0 - or Indigo - is set to use software advancements to improve the performance of hardware; bringing upgrade costs down and speeds up without being required to make significant network infrastructure investments moving forward.

AT&T is racing against its top rival, Verizon, to deploy the first commercial 5G in the US. It was recently reported that Verizon is in the midst of launching ten 5G market trials across the country in both dense urban and suburban areas beyond its local exchange carrier footprint. Verizon CFO, Matt Ellis, said during a call with investors that Verizon's goal is to test 5G services in varying neighborhoods as it prepares for commercial launch.

Verizon released its own 5G specifications to vendors last summer, which it said was intended to assist vendors to develop interoperable 5G equipment for pre-standard testing and fabrication. The company has been trailing what it calls "wireless fiber".

Because 5G requires a strong fiber or microwave wireless component for backhaul traffic, Ellis noted that Verizon is excited about its acquisition of XO Communications, which it announced in February 2016. The strategy behind the deal is for Verizon to expand its metro and on-net fiber network using XO's fiber assets as well as lease XO's millimeter wave (mmWave) spectrum holdings with an option to buy those leases in 2018, according to reports.

Meanwhile, in the highly developed nation of South Korea, the government recently announced plans to expand the bandwidth allocated to 5G mobile services by next year, when the country will host the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games.

The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning will share bandwidth in the 1.3GHz range between the country's three mobile carriers, Korea Telecom (KT), SK Telecom and LG Uplus. South Korean ministry official Choi Young-hae said the ministry is forming a team to "work on allocating 5G bandwidth and come up with a detailed plan."

According to a report by South Korean news agency Yonhap, the plan was finalized during a government meeting presided over by minister Yoo Il-ho. The ministry did not specify how much bandwidth would be allocated for 5G applications in the 1.3GHz band. Spectrum in the 1.3GHz range does not appear to have been used for mobile telephony in the past - most services use 900MHz and below, and 1.7GHz and up. GPS satellites use 1.38105GHz.

The ministry said it had been in talks with South Korea's mobile carriers, as well as technology firms, including Samsung and LG, to draw up the plan aimed at taking the lead in 5G network technologies.

In China, the leading telecoms operator China Mobile, said in December last year that it will begin major trials for 5G in 2018, kicking off a new round of billions of dollars in new investment to usher in the high-speed communications era of the Internet of Things (IoT). The company said it will test the technology for about two years, with the target date of 2020 set for launching 5G commercial services, according to CEO Li Yue.

In the past, China has rolled out its newest generation of mobile networks about two to three years after its Western counterparts. Li said at an event discussing the rollout of 5G that the technology will "change the parameters for development in many industries."

Li added that the high-speed technology is optimized for IoT, a concept in which humans and smart devices use the internet to communicate with one another to perform tasks like switching on devices remotely. He also said the response time after inputting information is just 1 millisecond for 5G, compared with 20 milliseconds for current 4G networks and 100 to 150 milliseconds for 3G.

Working towards standardization
There are a number of operators that have announced plans to launch 5G services before 2020. However, these will not typically be based on networks and devices complying with 5G standards, and so are excluded from Ovum's forecasts, Mike Roberts' report says.

Ovum defines a 5G subscription as "an active connection to a 5G network via a 5G device". 5G is further defined as a system based on and complying with 3GPP 5G standards, beginning with parts of 3GPP Release 15 (the first set of 5G standards) which is scheduled to be finalized in 2018, ahead of early rollouts in 2020. But as of now, there's no single definition for 5G. This leads to a potential problem for both business and users.

"The main use case for 5G through 2021 will be enhanced mobile broadband services, although fixed broadband services will also be supported, especially in the US," says Roberts. "Over time 5G will support a host of use cases including Internet of Things and mission-critical communications, but Ovum does not believe those use cases will be supported by standardized 5G services through 2021."

In an effort to overcome these 5G issues - which mainly consist of incompatible hardware - various parties such as handset manufacturers, operators, vendors, and the 3GPP, are working together to make sure the arrival of 5G is seamless.

In addition, Audi, BMW, Daimler, Ericsson, Huawei, Intel, Nokia and Qualcomm announced in September last year the formation of the "5G Automotive Association" (5GAA) with the goal of addressing the issues around connected mobility and road safety in the IoT era.

Vodafone was the first to join the association - a move that showed how the company is stepping up activities in developing connected cars, following its announcement that it had begun testing LTE-V2X, a new technology for vehicle-to-vehicle communications.

Luke Ibbetson, Vodafone's head of R&D and technology strategy, who will join the 5GAA board, said the communication between vehicles, infrastructure and pedestrians using C-V2X (Cellular Vehicle-to-Everything) "will be fundamental to the creation of intelligent transport systems."

China's ZTE Corporation was the latest company to join the association in January. Other members include China Telecom, NTT DoCoMo, Ford, Gemalto, LG, SK Telecom, T-Mobile and Verizon.

The main activities of the association include defining and harmonizing use cases, technical requirements and implementation strategies; supporting standardization and regulatory bodies, certification and approval processes; addressing vehicle-to-everything technology requirements, such as wireless connectivity, security, privacy, authentication and distributed cloud architectures; and running joint innovation and development projects.

Published in Reports

SK Telecom (South Korea Telecom) announced that it, together with Ericsson and BMW Korea, has realized a peak rate of 3.6Gbps for a connected vehicle travelling at a speed of 170 kilometers per hour.

The demonstration took place at BMW driving center located in Yeongjong Island, Incheon, where the three companies have successfully deployed the world’s largest mmWave 5G trial network using the 28GHz band and demonstrated the world’s first 5G-based connected car in November 2016.

Through the application of its advanced beamforming and beam tracking technologies, SK Telecom was able to address the limitations of millimeter wave bands stemming from the fact radio waves in these bands use high gain and high directivity antenna, which causes signals to be often blocked by objects standing in their path and have smaller coverage.

The 3.6Gbps of data rate realized by the three companies significantly enhances the stability of connected car services by improving image recognition and V2X (Vehicle to Everything Communication) technologies. That is, a vehicle will be able to communicate, in real time, with other vehicles, traffic lights and surveillance cameras to understand and respond to unexpected situations and obstacles and remain within the lane in a much shorter time.

Moreover, the ultra-high transmission speed at millimeter waves is expected to have a huge impact on all 5G use cases including augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), drones and robots. For instance, companies will be able to develop innovative 5G services, including a service that allows users to watch VR content within a moving bus or a drone that sends real-time video of a disaster-stricken area to provide a better understanding of the situation.

Furthermore, with much faster transmission speeds over the 5G network, media services including 4K UHD image, VR live broadcast and 3D video services will experience further improvements.

Meanwhile, in January 2017 SK Telecom has announced its plans to build a "New ICT Ecosystem," which encompasses 1) autonomous driving and connected car, 2) AI and big data, 3) smart home, 4) energy management, 5) media, and 6) global content.

"Connected car is regarded as the barometer for 5G as it can only be realized through the combination of all 5G technologies. As ultra-high speed and ultra-low latency are prerequisites for realizing autonomous driving and immersive media services, the 3.6Gbps transmission speed we successfully demonstrated today not only brings us a step closer to realizing autonomous driving, but will also have a great impact on a broader range of industries," said Park Jin-hyo, Senior Vice President and Head of Network Technology R&D Center.

"SK Telecom will continue to work closely with global players to develop 5G technologies and launch innovative 5G trial services."

Published in Internet of Things

M1 Limited (M1), Singapore’s third largest mobile carrier, and Huawei announced on 18 January that they had successfully achieved Singapore’s highest 5G transmission speeds of 35Gbps. The demonstration, at M1’s main operating centre in Jurong, is part of Huawei’s long-term commitment to the successful deployment of 5G network by the year 2020.

The M1-Huawei demonstration, using millimeter wave (mmWave), was conducted over the 73GHz band at E-band. The trial validates the performance of 5G in high frequency bands and opens a new landscape for the standardization of 5G high-frequency technologies in Singapore.

Various candidate 5G technologies and standards, overseen by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) standards body, are undergoing aggressive trials globally. The 3GPP is expected to finalize 5G technology standards for global adoption and deployment by 2020.

Alongside greater throughput speeds – users will be able to download a 1080p movie in seconds – 5G technology will support the massive number of low-latency connections critical to driving the next wave of virtual/augmented reality and Internet-of-Things applications such as autonomous driving.

“Singapore’s mobile networks are widely acknowledged as amongst the most advanced worldwide, and M1 is committed to staying at the forefront of 5G technology to ensure our consumers enjoy the best experience and latest smart applications,” said Mr Denis Seek, Chief Technical Officer, M1.

A high broadband, ultra low latency 5G network is vital to power smart applications that will fundamentally transform lives of Singaporeans in a ‘Smart Nation’. As early as in 2009, Huawei set up its research into 5G since its deployment of the world's first commercial LTE network, and has continuously made long-term investments in research on high-frequency channel for mainstream application scenarios.

In January 2016, M1 and Huawei together achieved a combined download and upload speed of more than 1Gbps. The trial is conducted using existing commercial hardware infrastructure supplied by Huawei and a prototype CAT14 device. The trial was made possible through the innovative integration of four advanced network technologies: 3CC (three component carrier) aggregation, 4x4 MIMO (Multiple-Input Multiple-Output), Higher Order Modulation 256 QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation) and 2CC uplink carrier aggregation.

Published in Telecom Vendors