Displaying items by tag: Huawei

US considers buying controlling stakes in Nokia and Ericsson

Written on Friday, 07 February 2020 07:37

US Attorney general Bill Barr has called for The United States and its allies to take controlling stakes in Nokia, Ericsson or both to battle Chinese telecoms giant Huawei's dominance of the 5G market.

Published in Government

Brand Finance, a leading brand valuation and strategy consultancy headquartered in UK, has named Huawei one of the top 10 most valuable brands for the first time ever. In the recently published Brand Finance Global 500 2020 report, Huawei is the third Chinese company on the list with a brand value of US$ 65.084 billion, up 4.5 per cent year-on-year.

 

“Clearly the next big opportunity for the telecoms industry, the 5G space is inviting fierce competition, with Huawei expanding into markets traditionally covered by Western providers. Despite sparking controversy, the Chinese giant is making clear headway, and with a brand value of US$65.1 billion, now counts among the world’s top 10 most valuable brands for the first time,” writes Brand Finance in the report.

 

With 205 companies accounting for 45.4 per cent of the top 500, US is the most represented economy in the ranking with a combined brand value of US$ 320.4 billion. China follows closely with 70 companies, equivalent to 18.9 per cent, and a combined brand value of US$ 133.4 billion.

 

The technology sector continues to draw the most attention as the most valuable sector. Of the 500 most valuable brands, 46 of them – or 14 percent – originated from the tech sector. Together, they have a combined brand value of US$ 986.5 billion. Huawei is the sole Chinese tech brand among the top 10 most valuable brands.

Huawei’s brand value growth can be attributed to its commitment to innovation to continually improve product competitiveness and consumer experience.

In 2019, Huawei predicted that it would ship 240 million units of smartphones and retain its position as the world’s second largest smartphone manufacturer. The company shipped more than 44 million units of its HUAWEI Mate Series and HUAWEI P Series flagship devices, recording a 50 percent increase year-on-year. Winning critical and popular acclaim for their technological breakthroughs, Huawei’s 5G smartphones recorded 6.9 million unit shipments as of December 2019.

Last year, Huawei also built out its all-scenario experience by introducing a range of new products spanning multiple categories, including tablets, PCs, wearables and IoT devices in the HiLink ecosystem, all of which exhibited a certain degree of growth.

Looking at the future, Huawei remains committed to the all-scenario strategy. Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei Consumer Business Group, said, “The all-scenario strategy will remain the primary focus of Huawei for the next five to 10 years.  We are steadfast in our commitment to creating an integrated ecosystem, in which tablets, PCs, VR devices, wearables, smart displays, smart speakers, cars and IoT devices are all connected to smartphones to deliver a truly seamless user experience.”

Published in Telecom Vendors

Huawei greenlighted for limited role in UK’s 5G network

Written on Wednesday, 29 January 2020 05:12

The UK has finally approved a limited role for Chinese telecoms giant Huawei in the country's 5G network, but underscored that "high risk vendors" would be excluded from "sensitive" core infrastructure.

The United States wanted Prime Minister Boris Johnson to ban Huawei completely, arguing that Beijing could use the company’s equipment to spy on western counterparts. Huawei has strongly denied any involvement in espionage.

London's decision, following a meeting of the National Security Council chaired by Boris Johnson, came shortly after Brussels said it would allow Huawei a limited 5G role in the European Union. 

"We want world-class connectivity as soon as possible but this must not be at the expense of our national security," Britain's Digital Secretary Nicky Morgan said in reference to high-speed fifth generation networks that offer almost instantaneous and reliable data transfer.

"High risk vendors never have been and never will be in our most sensitive networks," she added.

Huawei’s VP welcomed news that it would have at least a limited role in building Britain's high-speed fifth generation networks, after Washington lobbied hard for the company to be sidelined completely on security concerns 

"Huawei is reassured by the UK government's confirmation that we can continue working with our customers to keep the 5G roll-out on track," said Huawei Vice-President Victor Zhang.

"This evidence-based decision will result in a more advanced, more secure and more cost-effective telecoms infrastructure that is fit for the future."

Unlike the United States, Britain has been using Huawei technology in its systems for the past 15 years. Johnson insisted that the UK can have "technological progress" while preserving national security. Huawei is widely viewed as providing the most advanced alternative for super-fast data transfers behind technologies such as self-driving cars and remotely operated factory robots.

Published in Telecom Vendors

Huawei awaits approval for role in UK’s 5G network

Written on Monday, 27 January 2020 13:50

Despite opposition from the United States, Britain is to yet to decide on a potential role for China's Huawei in developing its 5G telecoms network. However, reports say this will be in a limited capacity after heavy US obstruction on security grounds.

"The UK has a momentous decision ahead on 5G," US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted as Washington continued to heap pressure on Prime Minister Boris Johnson up to the last minute in urging a complete sidelining of Huawei.

However a senior UK official last week strongly hinted at a green light for Huawei, while the Financial Times over the weekend reported that Johnson was Tuesday "expected to approve a restricted role".UK ministers are said to be looking to impose a cap on Huawei's market share in the project.

There has meanwhile been widespread speculation that Britain would allow Huawei into "non-core" elements of 5G networks, such as antennae and base stations attached to masts and roofs. The core carries out essential functions such as authenticating subscribers and sending voice and data between devices and is sometimes described as the "brains" or "heart" of a network.

The United States has banned Huawei from the rollout of its next generation 5G mobile networks because of concerns that the firm could be under the control of Beijing. Huawei strongly deny this claim.

Washington has been lobbying Britain to do the same, even threatening to limit intelligence sharing between the two allies should the UK go its own way. Britain has moved to downplay US security fears.

The UK official pointed out that unlike the United States, Britain has been using Huawei technology in its systems for the past 15 years. UK security agencies believe they have managed the risk so far and will be able to do so with the 5G network.

The 5G technology offers almost instantaneous data transfer and is seen as key for technologies such as self-driving cars and remotely operated factory robots.

Published in Telecom Vendors

The case of Huawei's Meng explained

Written on Friday, 17 January 2020 07:44

Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of the Chinese telecom giant and daughter of its founder Ren Zhengfei, was detained in the Canadian city on a US warrant in late 2018. Her arrest put the 47-year-old at the center of the US and China's battle over Huawei's growing global reach. Hearings into whether she can be extradited to the United States will begin on January 20 in Vancouver, in a case with potential repercussions for ties between the US, China and Canada.

Published in Government

Huawei Consumer Business Group (CBG) announced that it has shipped 6.9 million units of 5G smartphones as of December 2019, in addition to offering end-to-end 5G solutions. The strong sales reflect Huawei’s relentless commitment to 5G R&D and reinforce Huawei’s leadership in 5G technology.

Published in Telecom Vendors

US sets deadline for Huawei and ZTE designation

Written on Tuesday, 07 January 2020 11:07

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) said it will accept public comments until Feb. 3 on its determination that China’s Huawei Technologies Co Ltd and ZTE Corp pose national security threats.

In a document published by the FCC, it reports that interested parties can submit responses on Huawei and ZTE’s designation, which aims to prevent money from the US Universal Service Fund being used to purchase kit from companies deemed a national security risk.

 “The FCC adopts a rule that prospectively prohibits the use of Universal Service Fund funds to purchase or obtain any equipment or services produced or provided by a covered company posing a national security threat to the integrity of communications networks or the communications supply chain.”

As the Commission stated in the Protecting Against National Security Threats Notice, the promotion of national security is consistent with the public interest, and USF funds should be used to deploy infrastructure and provide services that do not undermine national security.

In November, the FCC voted unanimously to bar U.S. rural wireless providers from availing of an $8.5 billion government fund to purchase Huawei or ZTE telecommunications equipment.

Last month, Huawei filed a petition with the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court in New Orleans challenging the FCC decision. The FCC will review public comments before finalizing the designations on Feb. 3.

Published in Reports

Cites FCC’s arbitrary findings and failure to offer due process protections

Published in Telecom Vendors

Global smartphone market on the rise

Written on Wednesday, 06 November 2019 05:54

Research from Canalys has indicated signs of a growth in mobile device sales in the third quarter of the year. This increase is seen after two years of a decline in shipments. Global smartphone shipments have increased by 1% in Q3 2019.

Samsung shipped the greatest number of smartphones, at 78.9 million devices, a rise of 11 per cent, compared to the corresponding period the year prior.

Huawei recovered from a weak second quarter and was second with 66.8 million units, up 29%, to gain 19% of the market. In its home market alone, Huawei shipped 41.5 million smartphones to reach a record market share of 42%, an annual growth of 66%.

While most of its growth was attributed to its performance in China, it also saw growth in overseas markets with volumes increasing 3.8 million over the quarter to 25.3 million due to a rise in demand during the pause in procurement in Q2.  

By contrast, and mainly by weak performance of the iPhone XR, XS and XS Max in the lead up to its September launch event, Apple shipped 43.5 million units, an annual decline of 7%, leading to 12.3% of the market.  This is an improvement on Q1 and Q2, which saw double digit declines.

Vincent Thielke, Canalys research analyst said that while the iPhone 11 launched to strong reviews, the lack of 5G in any of Apple’s products will hurt it in early 2020.

“It will miss out on heavy operator investment in 5G marketing and promotions, and the wide expectation for Apple to launch a 5G iPhone in September 2020 may convince some customers to delay purchasing, to ensure their device is future-proof,” Thielke said.

Published in Devices

China condemns US for ‘economic bullying’ of Huawei & ZTE

Written on Thursday, 31 October 2019 07:08

China blasted as "economic bullying" a US proposal to block service providers buying from Chinese tech companies Huawei and ZTE. The two Chinese vendors have been accused of posing a threat to national security because of their ties to the Beijing government.

The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) said that the proposed rules were part of an initiative to "safeguard the nation's communications networks".

FCC chairman Ajit Pai also said: “We cannot ignore the risk that the Chinese government will seek to exploit network vulnerabilities in order to engage in espionage, insert malware and viruses, and otherwise compromise our critical communications networks”.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang slammed the US proposal as an attempt to "oppress certain Chinese businesses with groundless accusations".

"The United States' economic bullying goes against the market principles which the US has always trumpeted," he said.

The proposal, to be voted on November 19, marks the latest effort by Washington to further damage Huawei’s global reputation.  Huawei says that US has provided no proof of any security risks posed by the company.

"In 30 years of business, Huawei has never had a major security-related incident in the 170 countries where we operate," the statement said.

"Banning specific vendors based on country origin will do nothing to protect America's telecommunications networks."

In May, Washington said it would blacklist Huawei from the US market and from buying crucial US components, though it has twice extended the company 90-day reprieves, the latest coming in August.

The United States has expressed concern that Huawei equipment could contain security loopholes that allow China to spy on global communications traffic, and has pressured US allies to block the use of Huawei equipment.

Published in Telecom Vendors
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