Displaying items by tag: China

China defends Huawei over latest espionage accusations

Written on Wednesday, 16 January 2019 07:09

China has called upon other countries to cease the “groundless fabrications and unreasonable restrictions” against technology giant Huawei, after a Polish official said his country could limit the use of the company’s products by public entities following the arrest of Huawei employee Wang Weijing.

Poland is the latest country to express concerns over Huawei devices amidst security fears. Joachim Brudzinski, Poland’s internal affairs minister, has called for the European Union and NATO to work on a joint position over whether to exclude Huawei from their markets.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said the accusatory security threats “suppress and restrict Chinese technology companies’ development abroad”, and China hoped the Polish side would work to create mutual trust and maintain relations.

“We urge relevant parties to cease the groundless fabrications and unreasonable restrictions toward Huawei and other Chinese companies, and create a fair, good and just environment for mutual investment and normal cooperation by both sides’ companies,” Hua Chunying said.

“Using security reasons to hype, obstruct or restrict normal cooperation between companies in the end will only hurt one’s own interests.”

The Shenzhen-based equipment company has seen their equipment banned from Australia, New Zealand and Japan, and stripped from core telecom systems in the United Kingdom. Governments around the world have grown increasingly wary of Huawei’s presence in critical national telecoms infrastructure, amid cybersecurity fears and potential links to Beijing.

Pressure from the United States secret service to boycott Huawei equipment has led to a number of countries to exclude the phone giant in their rollout of 5G networks. In August, The Trump administration signed a bill that barred the U.S. government from using Huawei equipment and is reportedly considering an executive order that would also ban U.S. companies from using the Chinese products.

An executive for Huawei Meng Wanzhou was also arrested in December in Canada at the request of U.S authorities and awaits possible extradition to the U.S.  Huawei has always strenuously denied all accusations of espionage, and Hua Chunying maintained Wang Weijing’s alleged actions had “no relation to the company.”

Huawei has since sacked Wang after he was arrested along with a Polish security official on charges of spying for the Chinese government. In a statement, the company said the former employee had brought “disrepute” to the company.

Karol Okonski, a Polish government official responsible for cyber security said that “abrupt” policy changes toward Huawei were not warranted after the arrests, but that the use of the company’s products by state entities could be reviewed.

Published in Telecom Vendors

A state-run Chinese tabloid newspaper has written a strongly-worded editorial in which it has condemned the actions of Poland in the arrest of Huawei executive Wang Weijing in Warsaw.

Polish special agents arrested the executive for the Chinese telecommunications giant for alleged espionage after a lengthy investigation. Authorities claim that they believe he was spying for China.

Huawei moved swiftly in terms of responding to the latest controversy involving one of its employees by terminating the contract of Wang Weijing with immediate effect. However, the nationalist tabloid Global Times has been critical of the way Poland has handled the situation and has accused them of being an accomplice of the United States.

The newspaper wrote, “Beijing should resolutely negotiate with Warsaw and conduct relative counter-measures, helping the world understand that Poland is an accomplice of the US.”

The editorial added that if Huawei suffers further setbacks as a result of this arrest, which it more than likely will, then it will affect the confidence of Chinese society - and would represent an example to the rest of the world that it can bully Chinese enterprises. The paper has pleaded for China to remain strong and has called for Poland to suffer as a consequence of its actions.

The editorial said, “China must not be soft at this point. Beijing will not bully Warsaw -- and it is unworthy to do so -- but the latter must pay for the offense.”

The newspaper did not clarify as to what kind of measures China should take. China’s Foreign Ministry voiced its concerns about Wang's arrest in Poland, whilst as aforementioned above Huawei has sought to distance itself from the case as it fired the employee, saying his alleged actions have no relation to the company.

 A Polish man was also arrested for alleged espionage along with Wang on Tuesday.  Both men are suspected of having worked for Chinese services and to the detriment of Poland," according to Polish special services spokesman Stanislaw Zaryn.

Published in Telecom Vendors

Chinese telecommunications behemoth Huawei has moved swiftly to terminate the contract of an employee who has been arrested in Poland amidst claims he was spying for China.

Huawei executive Wang Weijing was detained by Polish authorities on Friday, following a lengthy investigation that was conducted by Poland’s special services. It is believed that Weijing is a director for the Polish branch of Huawei.

It’s the latest setback for Huawei’s brand globally following the high-profile arrest of the vendors’ CTO, Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver in December. She is fighting extradition to the US, where she stands accused of fraud relating to business activity in Iran.

The Chinese vendor robustly defended its CTO following her arrest and demanded her immediate release from jail. However, Huawei has wasted no timing in trying to distance itself from this latest scandal in Poland by announcing it has fired the employee in question for harming the company’s global reputation.

In a statement given to the Global Times, Huawei said that Wang Weijing was arrested for ‘personal reasons’ and said the incident caused significant damage to the company at a time when it’s under intense scrutiny regarding security.

Huawei cited management rules in company contracts and said it was left with no decision but to terminate its employer relationship with Wang Weijing immediately.  Poland has claimed that they firmly believe the Huawei executive was spying for China.

China’s Foreign Ministry responded quickly to the claims made by Polish authorities and expressed that it was ‘highly concerned’ by the arrest. The latest controversy is something Huawei really could’ve done without.

US President Donald Trump is expected to issue an executive order which would ban US companies from working with Chinese vendors ZTE and Huawei over the alleged risk both pose to national security.

In addition to this, Australia and Japan have blocked Huawei from participating in the construction of their super-fast 5G networks, whilst the UK and New Zealand are also considering banning the vendor from the rollout of its 5G networks.

EU spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic refused to "speculate" when asked Friday if there were any concerns about Chinese retaliation.

"We are aware of the reports and we will be indeed in touch with the Polish authorities for further information," she told reporters. 

Published in Telecom Vendors

Embattled Chinese telecommunication vendors Huawei and ZTE have received a welcome reprieve following the news that two Spanish operators are planning on using them for forthcoming 5G pilots.

Published in Telecom Vendors

A Chinese drone maker has unveiled an unmanned warplane that can fly around for forty hours without needing to be refueled. ‘The Spy Hawk’ is invisible to radar and can scout ground targets from 9,800 ft according to its developers.

Footage released by Sea Hawke General Aviation Equipment Company Ltd shows the drone taking off from a runway in an unspecified location, and was widely shared across Chinese social media on New Year’s Day.

It is the first time the top-secret drone has been showcased to the public, as details surrounding the aircraft were previously shrouded in secrecy by the Beijing government.

A prototype was revealed briefly to spectators during the China International Aviation and Aerospace Exhibition in Zhuhai last November, but until now information regarding the aircraft remained widely unknown.

The Spy Hawk has a wingspan of 18m (59ft), can carry up to 370KG and is capable of taking a clear picture of a car's number plate while flying at the altitude of 3,000 metres (9,800 feet). The warplane can penetrate key enemy targets in a “highly threatening battling environment” says its designers, and is constructed of “world first” technologies.

The plane's deputy designer Wang Jianping says the drone is also equipped with China’s most advanced photo-electric aerial platform and contains seven different cameras that can turn 360 degrees.

It was announced last February by Sea Hawke that the drone had completed its first flight a month before. 

It is the fourth UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) from the Chinese company after predecessor stealth drones ‘Star Shadow’, ‘Sharp Sword’ and ‘CH-805’.

Published in Gadget

Chinese telecommunication vendors ZTE and Huawei have both endured a difficult number of years in the US marketplace – and their issues have multiplied during the Trump administration.

ZTE were momentarily crippled and almost went out of business following a decision by the US Department of Commerce to ban US companies from using their equipment and products for 7 years. However, following an intervention from US President Donald Trump, the ban was overturned and the vendor was instead hit with a $1bn fine and has to adhere to a number of strict rules and regulations.

Huawei have also been subjected to sharp criticism and have been deemed by US intelligence as a serious threat to national security due to their close ties to the Chinese government. Observers believe that the aggression from the US towards the Chinese telecommunication vendors is part of Trump’s plan to use them as pawns in his trade war with China.

Tensions between Washington and Beijing escalated when ZTE were initially banned, and it sparked an angry backlash from China. The rest of the world looked on anxiously as the two economic superpowers clashed head-on, it has since deescalated, but the high-profile arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver has once again put diplomatic relations between the two countries under the microscope.

However, the situation in the US for both ZTE and Huawei is set to worsen following reports that US President Donald Trump is set to issue an executive order that would effectively ban operators in the country from using the Chinese manufacturer’s equipment and products.

Reuters has reported that the Trump administration has been mulling over the order for eight months, but it expected to formally enact it later this month.  It is said the order would not name Huawei or its compatriot ZTE by name but would give the US Department of Commerce scope to ban any supplier it suspects of being a threat to national security.

Published in Telecom Vendors

Huawei executive granted bail

Written on Wednesday, 12 December 2018 10:52

Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Huawei, has been released on Can$10 million bail by a Canadian court. The Chinese telecom executive faces a US extradition bid on charges related to alleged violations of Iran sanctions.

She was ordered to surrender her passport and will be subjected to electronic monitoring whilst she stays in Vancouver. Her lawyer said she was not deemed a flight risk, as she did not want to ‘embarrass China.’

The daughter of Huawei’s founder, Meng is accused of lying to bankers about the use of a covert subsidiary to sell to Iran in breach of sanctions. She faces more than 30 years in prison if she is convicted.

The extradition process, scheduled to start on February 6, could take months or even years.

Her arrest has shaken China's relations with Canada and the United States, with concerns that it could derail a US-China trade war truce. President Donald Trump has said he "would certainly intervene" in the case if it can help strike a deal with China.

Meanwhile, the US State Department called on China to "end all forms of arbitrary detentions" after Michael Kovrig - a North East Asia senior adviser, and former Canadian diplomat - was detained in Beijing. The international crisis group (ICG) said in a statement that it has received no information about Kovrig since his detention and is concerned about his health and safety.

Former Canadian ambassador to Beijing, Guy Saint-Jacques, said Kovrig's detention was likely linked to Meng's case.

"There is no coincidence in China," Saint-Jacques told AFP. "In this case it is clear the Chinese government wants to put maximum pressure on the Canadian government."

Published in Telecom Vendors

Qualcomm wins court injunction against Apple in China

Written on Wednesday, 12 December 2018 10:18

The chipmaker has won a preliminary injunction that would ban the sale and import of Apple’s recent iPhone models in China, including the iPhone 6S, 6S Plus, iPhone 7, 7 Plus, 8, 8 Plus, and iPhone X.

The court ruled that Apple is violating software patents held by Qualcomm that are specifically related to resizing pictures and managing applications.

Qualcomm has accused  Apple of ‘stealing’ Qualcomm’s source code to share with rival modem supplier Intel, and that the American phone giant continues to benefit from their intellectual property while refusing to compensate them. It has spent the past year trying to ban iPhone sales in China.

Apple accuses Qualcomm of using its market dominance to unreasonably raise prices, commenting:

“Qualcomm’s effort to ban our products is another desperate move by a company whose illegal practices are under investigation by regulators around the world.”

Apple continues to sell the devices in China.

Published in Telecom Vendors

Chinese media outlets have launched a scathing attack on the United States for its role in the arrest and subsequent detainment of Huawei’s CFO in Vancouver earlier this week.

Published in Telecom Vendors

Japanese government bans Huawei and ZTE products

Written on Monday, 10 December 2018 07:54

The Japanese government has announced that it will ban telecommunications equipment manufactured by Chinese vendors Huawei and ZTE amidst fears about cybersecurity.

Published in Telecom Vendors
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